Blue gowns, wipes, and warm hands: My first mammogram!



Last Tuesday I had my very first mammogram! And...It wasn't so bad. I arrived at the clinic at 10 am and left twenty minutes later. The process was pretty straight forward. It went a little something g like this:

I checked in at the front desk, where I had to fill out a few forms. Nothing complicated. They just wanted to make sure that I wasn't pregnant and to assure that I didn't have a latex allergy. I was sent to the diagnostic/imaging lab where I met the technician who would perform my mammography. She was nice enough...but nothing to write home about :-). 
She directed me to the changing area where I changed into a BLUE GOWN. Yeah...not a PINK one. I guess I have drank the pink ribbon cool aid, because I was actually bothered by the fact that my robe wasn't pink. Don't they know that pink is the universal breast cancer prevention color? I digress...sorry, back to the point...

While changing into "the robe" I also noticed these...
"Mammo-Wipes". You use them to wipe your breast and underarm area...to make sure that there are no lotion or deodorant residues on your skin before the testing. I was thinking...the folks who created these things are so opportunistic...and possibly millionaires! I mean...millions of women get a mammogram in the US each year. 
Anyway, the technician led me into the mammography lab, where I got an up close and personal look at the machinery. The things that I read about the actual screening procedure were fairly accurate. The technician took several images (X-ray) of each of my breast. This process is called an "imaging study". The intent of the imaging study is to get a clear view of all parts of the breast...including some of that breast tissue that may wrap under your arm.  How did she do this? Glad u asked...
Well, the technician had me stand in front of the machine and place my breast (one at a time ) on the black tray in the picture. She (I had a girl) lowered the clear plastic tray down on my breast to compress or "flatten" them. Yes, flatten them, so that she could get a better image of the breast tissue. This is not the most comfortable thing to have done as it involved some re-positioning (by the the technician) of my breast to get the best pictures.  Make no mistake, this is a hands on process ladies. But it wasn't too bad...and certainly not any worse than the other thing that we get done every 3 years (...veiled reference to pap test). Gotta keep it in perspective...

I've already received my test results...things looked normal. But I will continue to do periodic checks to make sure that there are not "unusual" changes with my breast (i.e., pain, discharges, lumps/dimples, etc.). Hope this helps those of you who are considering getting this test in the near future. 

Take care of yourself ladies!!! Love you much! 

No comments

Post a Comment

Professional Blog Designs by pipdig